From rhizosphere to detritusphere: Soil structure formation driven by plant roots and the interactions with soil biota

Publikation: Beitrag in FachzeitschriftÜbersichtsarbeitForschungPeer-Review

Autoren

  • Carsten W. Mueller
  • Vera Baumert
  • Andrea Carminati
  • Amandine Germon
  • Maire Holz
  • Ingrid Kögel-Knabner
  • Stephan Peth
  • Steffen Schlüter
  • Daniel Uteau
  • Doris Vetterlein
  • Pedro Teixeira
  • Alix Vidal

Organisationseinheiten

Externe Organisationen

  • Technische Universität Berlin
  • University of Copenhagen
  • Technische Universität München (TUM)
  • ETH Zürich
  • Leibniz-Zentrum für Agrarlandschaftsforschung (ZALF) e.V.
  • Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung (UFZ)
  • Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg
  • Wageningen University and Research
Forschungs-netzwerk anzeigen

Details

OriginalspracheEnglisch
Aufsatznummer109396
FachzeitschriftSoil Biology and Biochemistry
Jahrgang193
Frühes Online-Datum9 März 2024
PublikationsstatusVeröffentlicht - Juni 2024

Abstract

Roots and the associated soil directly affected by root activity, termed the rhizosphere, have both been extensively studied and recognized for their crucial role in soil functioning. The formation of the rhizosphere is primarily driven by the effect of roots on shaping the physical structure of the soil, which in turn has direct feedbacks on the interactions between physical, biological and chemical processes. As a result, the rhizosphere is a hot spot for microbial activity, cycling of nutrients and turnover of organic matter. Despite the pivotal role of soil structure in controlling rhizosphere processes, we still lack a quantitative description and understanding of the interrelationships of root-systems and soil in the creation and stabilization of soil structure. We provide a comprehensive review of current knowledge and novel insights into processes that drive the formation and stabilization of soil structure in the rhizosphere. These processes are regulated by multiple indirect and direct pathways, involving root growth, the production of rhizodeposits and root hairs, as well as the activity of soil microorganisms and fauna. Further, we highlight that rhizosphere processes may persist and evolve after root death to an extent currently largely unknown. Finally, we identify five pertinent challenges that should be addressed to fully apprehend rhizosphere processes and thus harness the potential resilience of plant-soil interactions. These challenges include refining structural assessment and sampling of rhizosheaths, examining the rhizosphere in-situ and bridging the gap between solid phase and pore scale research. In our view, overcoming these obstacles can be accomplished by combining the power of imaging and isotopic approaches, especially at the field scale, encompassing diverse soils and plant species. The ultimate objective of future research should be to upscale rhizosphere processes by conducting more field experiments in concert with modeling efforts, under the umbrella of collaborative interdisciplinary research.

ASJC Scopus Sachgebiete

Zitieren

From rhizosphere to detritusphere: Soil structure formation driven by plant roots and the interactions with soil biota. / Mueller, Carsten W.; Baumert, Vera; Carminati, Andrea et al.
in: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, Jahrgang 193, 109396, 06.2024.

Publikation: Beitrag in FachzeitschriftÜbersichtsarbeitForschungPeer-Review

Mueller, CW, Baumert, V, Carminati, A, Germon, A, Holz, M, Kögel-Knabner, I, Peth, S, Schlüter, S, Uteau, D, Vetterlein, D, Teixeira, P & Vidal, A 2024, 'From rhizosphere to detritusphere: Soil structure formation driven by plant roots and the interactions with soil biota', Soil Biology and Biochemistry, Jg. 193, 109396. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2024.109396
Mueller, C. W., Baumert, V., Carminati, A., Germon, A., Holz, M., Kögel-Knabner, I., Peth, S., Schlüter, S., Uteau, D., Vetterlein, D., Teixeira, P., & Vidal, A. (2024). From rhizosphere to detritusphere: Soil structure formation driven by plant roots and the interactions with soil biota. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 193, Artikel 109396. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2024.109396
Mueller CW, Baumert V, Carminati A, Germon A, Holz M, Kögel-Knabner I et al. From rhizosphere to detritusphere: Soil structure formation driven by plant roots and the interactions with soil biota. Soil Biology and Biochemistry. 2024 Jun;193:109396. Epub 2024 Mär 9. doi: 10.1016/j.soilbio.2024.109396
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title = "From rhizosphere to detritusphere: Soil structure formation driven by plant roots and the interactions with soil biota",
abstract = "Roots and the associated soil directly affected by root activity, termed the rhizosphere, have both been extensively studied and recognized for their crucial role in soil functioning. The formation of the rhizosphere is primarily driven by the effect of roots on shaping the physical structure of the soil, which in turn has direct feedbacks on the interactions between physical, biological and chemical processes. As a result, the rhizosphere is a hot spot for microbial activity, cycling of nutrients and turnover of organic matter. Despite the pivotal role of soil structure in controlling rhizosphere processes, we still lack a quantitative description and understanding of the interrelationships of root-systems and soil in the creation and stabilization of soil structure. We provide a comprehensive review of current knowledge and novel insights into processes that drive the formation and stabilization of soil structure in the rhizosphere. These processes are regulated by multiple indirect and direct pathways, involving root growth, the production of rhizodeposits and root hairs, as well as the activity of soil microorganisms and fauna. Further, we highlight that rhizosphere processes may persist and evolve after root death to an extent currently largely unknown. Finally, we identify five pertinent challenges that should be addressed to fully apprehend rhizosphere processes and thus harness the potential resilience of plant-soil interactions. These challenges include refining structural assessment and sampling of rhizosheaths, examining the rhizosphere in-situ and bridging the gap between solid phase and pore scale research. In our view, overcoming these obstacles can be accomplished by combining the power of imaging and isotopic approaches, especially at the field scale, encompassing diverse soils and plant species. The ultimate objective of future research should be to upscale rhizosphere processes by conducting more field experiments in concert with modeling efforts, under the umbrella of collaborative interdisciplinary research.",
keywords = "Aggregate formation, Exudation, Microorganisms, Mucilage, Pore scale, Rhizodeposition, Rhizosheath, Root hair, Root legacy",
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note = "Funding Information: We especially thank the two editors handling our manuscript for their constructive feedback and valuable suggestions that significantly increased the quality and sharpened the focus of the manuscript. We also thank two anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments and suggestions. We are very grateful for the excellent support during NanoSIMS analyses and image processing by Carmen Hoeschen at Technische Universit{\"a}t M{\"u}nchen. The authors thank the DFG, German Research Foundation, for the funding in the framework of the priority program 2089 “Rhizosphere spatiotemporal organisation - a key to rhizosphere functions”.",
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Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - From rhizosphere to detritusphere

T2 - Soil structure formation driven by plant roots and the interactions with soil biota

AU - Mueller, Carsten W.

AU - Baumert, Vera

AU - Carminati, Andrea

AU - Germon, Amandine

AU - Holz, Maire

AU - Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

AU - Peth, Stephan

AU - Schlüter, Steffen

AU - Uteau, Daniel

AU - Vetterlein, Doris

AU - Teixeira, Pedro

AU - Vidal, Alix

N1 - Funding Information: We especially thank the two editors handling our manuscript for their constructive feedback and valuable suggestions that significantly increased the quality and sharpened the focus of the manuscript. We also thank two anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments and suggestions. We are very grateful for the excellent support during NanoSIMS analyses and image processing by Carmen Hoeschen at Technische Universität München. The authors thank the DFG, German Research Foundation, for the funding in the framework of the priority program 2089 “Rhizosphere spatiotemporal organisation - a key to rhizosphere functions”.

PY - 2024/6

Y1 - 2024/6

N2 - Roots and the associated soil directly affected by root activity, termed the rhizosphere, have both been extensively studied and recognized for their crucial role in soil functioning. The formation of the rhizosphere is primarily driven by the effect of roots on shaping the physical structure of the soil, which in turn has direct feedbacks on the interactions between physical, biological and chemical processes. As a result, the rhizosphere is a hot spot for microbial activity, cycling of nutrients and turnover of organic matter. Despite the pivotal role of soil structure in controlling rhizosphere processes, we still lack a quantitative description and understanding of the interrelationships of root-systems and soil in the creation and stabilization of soil structure. We provide a comprehensive review of current knowledge and novel insights into processes that drive the formation and stabilization of soil structure in the rhizosphere. These processes are regulated by multiple indirect and direct pathways, involving root growth, the production of rhizodeposits and root hairs, as well as the activity of soil microorganisms and fauna. Further, we highlight that rhizosphere processes may persist and evolve after root death to an extent currently largely unknown. Finally, we identify five pertinent challenges that should be addressed to fully apprehend rhizosphere processes and thus harness the potential resilience of plant-soil interactions. These challenges include refining structural assessment and sampling of rhizosheaths, examining the rhizosphere in-situ and bridging the gap between solid phase and pore scale research. In our view, overcoming these obstacles can be accomplished by combining the power of imaging and isotopic approaches, especially at the field scale, encompassing diverse soils and plant species. The ultimate objective of future research should be to upscale rhizosphere processes by conducting more field experiments in concert with modeling efforts, under the umbrella of collaborative interdisciplinary research.

AB - Roots and the associated soil directly affected by root activity, termed the rhizosphere, have both been extensively studied and recognized for their crucial role in soil functioning. The formation of the rhizosphere is primarily driven by the effect of roots on shaping the physical structure of the soil, which in turn has direct feedbacks on the interactions between physical, biological and chemical processes. As a result, the rhizosphere is a hot spot for microbial activity, cycling of nutrients and turnover of organic matter. Despite the pivotal role of soil structure in controlling rhizosphere processes, we still lack a quantitative description and understanding of the interrelationships of root-systems and soil in the creation and stabilization of soil structure. We provide a comprehensive review of current knowledge and novel insights into processes that drive the formation and stabilization of soil structure in the rhizosphere. These processes are regulated by multiple indirect and direct pathways, involving root growth, the production of rhizodeposits and root hairs, as well as the activity of soil microorganisms and fauna. Further, we highlight that rhizosphere processes may persist and evolve after root death to an extent currently largely unknown. Finally, we identify five pertinent challenges that should be addressed to fully apprehend rhizosphere processes and thus harness the potential resilience of plant-soil interactions. These challenges include refining structural assessment and sampling of rhizosheaths, examining the rhizosphere in-situ and bridging the gap between solid phase and pore scale research. In our view, overcoming these obstacles can be accomplished by combining the power of imaging and isotopic approaches, especially at the field scale, encompassing diverse soils and plant species. The ultimate objective of future research should be to upscale rhizosphere processes by conducting more field experiments in concert with modeling efforts, under the umbrella of collaborative interdisciplinary research.

KW - Aggregate formation

KW - Exudation

KW - Microorganisms

KW - Mucilage

KW - Pore scale

KW - Rhizodeposition

KW - Rhizosheath

KW - Root hair

KW - Root legacy

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DO - 10.1016/j.soilbio.2024.109396

M3 - Review article

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VL - 193

JO - Soil Biology and Biochemistry

JF - Soil Biology and Biochemistry

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ER -

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